Use apostrophes to form contractions, possessives, and, in rare cases, plurals.

If it looks or sounds awkward, try rewriting it to avoid the apostrophe.

For joint possession, you only need a single apostrophe. Including apostrophes for each possessor means they each have their own individual thing.

We write like we talk, so use the contractions of everyday conversation. Just don’t get carried away. We don’t use regional contractions like “ain’t”, “shan’t”, “y’all”, “mustn’t”, and so on.

Don’t turn nouns into contractions. In other words, don’t do something like this: Accounting’s a tough subject. Phrases like “accounting’s” get tricky when it comes to translation.

Examples

Let’s
They’re
You’ll
It’s
Do’s and don’ts
Yes’s and no’s
CPA’s and PhD’s
your business’s growth
Phyllis’s first foray into payments
our customers’ feelings
the growth of your business
the first time Phyllis took a job in payments
how our customers feel
Jack and Jill’s concept pitch moved the audience to tears.
Jack’s and Jill’s teams support two completely different business functions.