For the most part, write in simple tenses—past, present, and future. They’re direct, clear, and short.

Try to stay away from progressive tenses unless you need to convey ongoing action.

Know why else you should write using simple tenses? They’re easier for non-native speakers to understand and for translation teams to translate.

Do

You get a discount for QuickBooks. (present)
You got a discount for QuickBooks. (past)
You’ll get a discount for QuickBooks. (future)
Review your transactions. (present)

Don't

You’re getting a discount. (present progressive)
You’ve gotten a discount since January. (present perfect)
You’ve been getting a discount since January. (present perfect progressive)
You were getting a discount when you unsubscribed. (past progressive)
You had gotten a discount for months when you unsubscribed. (past perfect)
You had been getting a discount for months when you unsubscribed. (past perfect progressive)
You’ll be getting a discount next year. (future progressive)
You’ll have gotten a discount all year. (future perfect)
You’ll have been getting a discount for months when you unsubscribe. (future perfect progressive)