year round

Use year-round (with a hyphen) if it’s before the word it’s modifying, but not if it follows the word it’s modifying.

Example: For most businesses, year-round tax planning is a good idea. Another example: You should plan for taxes year round.

year-over-year; YOY

Hyphenate as shown. Spell it out, don’t abbreviate it.

year-to-date; year to date

Use hyphens if the phrase precedes the word it’s modifying, but not if it follows the word it’s modifying.

Example: Add the year-to-date balances from your accounts to bring your report up to date.

your vs. my

Use your, not my, in the interface and related text. Using second-person maintains a consistent voice and promotes a friendly, conversational quality. See our writing style. Do this: Your mileage, Your accounts, Your sales tax Don’t do this: My Invoices, My Bills, My Employees