navigate

Don’t use, unless you’re on a ship or working with a GPS device. Use “find,” “browse,” “locate,” or “go to” instead.

navigation

There are many ways to direct customers to files, folders, websites, or pages. The important thing is to be as clear as possible so customers can find their way easily. Use your judgment and aim for clarity.

Find is a good alternative to search when you want the customer to feel empowered. For example, it’s more effective in the UI to use the phrase Find customers instead of Search customers because the word find implies success. Find is also a good option for simplicity and maintains a friendly tone.

Browse or locate are good choices when directing customers to files, folders, or drives on their desktop. Browse is the common button name in the Windows interface that customers click to see their files list, so telling them to browse helps associate the action with the button. Browse is often used for folder locations. Locate works well when the customer has actively saved or stored a file themselves and you don’t need to be specific about the location of the folder.

Go to gives the sense that the customer is moving away from where they are and going to another location. Use go to when you need to direct the customer away from their current workflow or location in the product—for example, when you need them to go to a specific URL. Don’t use go to for menu commands.

Examples:

Find the customer you want to send the invoice to.
Browse to the folder where you stored the backup file.
Locate the mylogo.gif file.
Go to maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source for a map to the conference.

net pay

The total amount a worker receives after taxes and deductions have been withheld from gross pay during a pay period. Also called “take-home pay,” “take home pay.”

When writing an accounting term, define the term first and provide the technical word second.

net price

The price or cost of a product or service, not including sales tax.

When writing an accounting term, define the term first and provide the technical word second.

net terms

A payment term component that indicates the full amount is due for payment in the number of days indicated. Terms of “net 20” mean that the full payment is due in 20 days. The term may be abbreviated to “n” instead of “net.”

When writing an accounting term, define the term first and provide the technical word second.

net-to-gross calculation; net to gross calculation; NTG calculation; NTG

A calculation for determining the gross wages needed to end up with a specific net pay amount.

When writing an accounting term, define the term first and provide the technical word second.

net-to-gross bonus; net to gross bonus; NTG bonus

A way to calculate a gross bonus amount by adding the taxes and deductions withheld to the net bonus amount.

When writing an accounting term, define the term first and provide the technical word second.

Next, Previous

OK to use in the product, such as in a step flow. Capitalize.

non-state obligation (where state is the name of any state)

Hyphenate this tax term as shown. Examples: non-New York obligation, non-California obligation

non taxable (zero-rated)

Pertaining to a product or service on which no value-added tax is levied in countries that use a VAT. Examples of these goods include many types of food and beverage, exported goods, donated goods sold by charity shops, equipment for the disabled, prescription medications, water and sewage services, books and other printed publications, children’s clothing, and financial services.

When writing an accounting term, define the term first and provide the technical word second.

non words

Don’t hyphenate unless combined with a proper noun.

DO: nonprofit, nontaxable, nonresident, noninventory
DO: non-QuickBooks, non-Intuit, non-American, non-accountant

none of the above

Write it as you see it here. No need for hyphens in any part of this phrase.

nonbusiness

Don’t write “non-business.”

noncash

Don’t write “non-cash.”

noncasualty losses

Don’t write “non-casualty losses.”

nondependent

Don’t write “non-dependent.”

nonelecting

Don’t write “non-electing.”

nonemployee

Don’t write “non-employee.”

nonexempt

Don’t write “non-exempt.”

nonfinal

Don’t write “non-final” or “non final.”

nonitemized

Don’t write “non-itemized.”

nonprofit

One word as shown.

nonrefundable

Don’t write “non-refundable.”

nonresident

One word as shown.

nontaxable

Don’t write “non-taxable.”

noon

Lowercase as shown.

notifications

Notifications should be brief, clear, and reassuring. If servers are going to be down for scheduled maintenance, don’t be alarmist about it. But feel free to incorporate some personality into it. Also, don’t refer to the notification area in the product. Work with design to solve for this another way.

DON’T: QuickBooks will be unavailable for about an hour from 12 midnight to 1:00 AM PT. We’re so sorry for the inconvenience. We’ll make sure nothing happens to your data while we update our servers.

DO: QuickBooks will be down for maintenance tonight, from 12 midnight to 1:00 a.m. PT. We scheduled it when you’d likely be asleep or binge-watching a show, but probably not doing accounting. You’re welcome.

DO: Heads up: Our servers are exhausted just *watching* the Olympics! They’ll be taking a break Saturday, Aug 19 at 9:00 PM PT. May we suggest using the downtime to practice your shotput throw?

not sure

Don’t write “unsure.”

number, no., #

Don’t use # in place of the word number unless there are significant space restrictions, such as in a mobile UI. The preferred abbreviation for number is no.

As a hashtag, use the symbol directly in front of the term you’re tagging, as in #hashtag.