Pacific time, PT

Capitalize, no periods (as shown). Example: M-F 7 AM to 9 PM PT

paid family leave

Don’t capitalize as “Paid Family Leave.”

page

OK to use only when referring to an interview, wizard, website pages, or a homepage. Otherwise, use window or tab. Use (page name) page to refer to web pages that come up in embedded browser windows. When referring to a page, use your judgment about its title. The point is to use the text that is the most visible and recognizable to the customer and unique to the page. You can mention the title bar name or the header on the screen.

pane

Refers to the separate areas of a split window. If a pane has a clearly designated title, capitalize the name. If not, use lowercase. Try not to refer to user interface elements in copy.

part-year residents

Hyphenate as shown.

pass-through entity

Hyphenate as shown.

password

Don’t capitalize this word unless it’s at the beginning of a sentence.

Passwords do not match

A set phrase used in Intuit Live Community. This is a little stiff for our voice. When you can change this, please do. Some options might include: “Looks like the passwords don’t match” or “Passwords don’t match.”

pay as you go, pay-as-you-go

Pertaining to a system of paying debts or meeting costs when they are incurred. Use hyphens when using it as a modifier. When writing an accounting term, it’s important to define the term first and provide the technical word second.

Pay now

On buttons, this phrase should appear in sentence case. In an invoice email, users can select this link to pay an invoice immediately.

pay period

The service period for which an employer pays wages to a worker and for which statutory or authorized deductions are made.

When writing an accounting term, try to define the term first and provide the technical word second.

pay run

Use “pay run,” not “payroll run.” The processing of periodic payroll payments for workers.

When writing an accounting term, try to define the term first and provide the technical word second.

pay stub

Two words as shown.

Pay this vendor with

Set in Sentence case as shown. It’s a label in QuickBooks that allows a user to select a foreign currency in which to pay a vendor or supplier.

paycheck

One word.

payday

One word.

payee

A person to whom money is paid or is to be paid, especially the person to whom a check is made payable. Look for other ways to communicate this in your writing, if you can. “Payee” is a little stiff for our voice.

payer

Don’t spell this term as “payor.” Better yet, don’t use either term. Come up with a more conversational way of saying this.

PayPal

Write as shown.

payroll tax

The tax an employer withholds or pays on behalf of their employees based on the wage or salary of the employee.

When writing an accounting term, try to define the term first and provide the technical word second.

payslip

One word.

PDF

When referring to a universal file type, such as PDF or JPEG, use uppercase; for the plural form add a lowercase s.

personal identification number, PIN

Since the abbreviation is probably more conversational than writing it out, abbreviating (in all caps) as “PIN” is fine. Don’t write pin or P.I.N.

pinch

Don’t write. Use “zoom in,” “zoom out,” or (for mobile) “double-tap to zoom” instead.

pixelated, pixilated

These terms mean different things, and most dictionaries autocorrect for the second term, which usually isn’t the meaning we want. Pixelated with an “e” means an image’s pixels are visible, usually unintentionally. Pixilated with an “i” means mentally unstable, bemused, or whimsical. To avoid unintended meanings, consider using language that discusses poor resolution or improper display instead.

phone numbers: (800) 123-4567

In the U.S., use dashes in phone numbers: 800-123-4567. For more examples, including international ones, see our guidelines for phone numbers.

PIN, Personal Identification Number

Since the abbreviation is probably more conversational than writing it out, abbreviating (in all caps) as “PIN” is fine. Don’t write pin or P.I.N.

platform

This term is acceptable only in the developer site and experience.

please

Avoid using this word unless you’re asking the customer for extraordinary effort, or if a major error or defect occurs. Use your judgment when it comes to inserting “please.” Sometimes it’s appropriate depending on the context.

plug in (v.); plug-in (n.)

Two words or hyphenated, depending on use. Also called an “add-on” or an “extension.”

Do this: Plug in your headphones and download the LoudBass plug-in for your browser.

pm

Use PM, uppercase, no periods. Don’t do this: p.m. For more information, see the guidelines for time.

point of sale, point-of-sale, POS

Here’s a definition in accounting language: [The] time and place where a retail transaction is completed[,] at which a customer makes a payment to the merchant in exchange for goods or after provision of a service.

pointer

Use “pointer” when you mean the arrow that moves around onscreen when you move your mouse. Use “cursor” when you mean the vertical blinking line that shows where text you type will appear.

pop-up (n, adj)

Hyphenate as shown.

postal code

Canada Post capitalizes it, but many places don’t. Check with your localization team to figure out how to get it right.

pound sign (#) or #hashtag

Don’t use # in place of the word number unless there are significant space restrictions, such as in a mobile UI. The preferred abbreviation for number is no.

As a hashtag, use the symbol directly in front of the term you’re tagging, as in #hashtag.

powered

Don’t use for “turn on” or “turn off.” Using powered can have a double meaning, as in “powered by” (for example, Turbo powered by TurboTax) and can even have legal connotations. Look for ways around using “powered.”

Powered by

A set phrase used in Intuit Live Community.

pre words

Generally, don’t hyphenate unless combined with a proper noun. For example: preassigned, predefined, preexisting, preselected, pre-Columbian, pre-Tudor, pre-World War II.

pre-fill

Hyphenate as shown.

press

Don’t use. For mobile, write “hold down” to communicate that the user can select one or more items in a view.

Don’t use “press + tap,” “press and tap,” “press + drag,” or “press and drag.” To express that the user can rearrange data within a view, or move data into a container, say “drag” or “hold to drag.”

previous, next

OK to use in the product, such as in a step flow. Capitalize.

printer-friendly

Hyphenate.

prior-year return, in a prior year

Don’t write “prior year return,” “prior year’s return,” or “in a prior-year.”

ProConnect Tax Online

Capitalize the name of this product as shown. This is the standalone title for the Intuit ProConnect Tax Online product.

product versions

When showing differences between product versions, avoid duplicating content as much as possible, but not to the extent that consolidation introduces overly complicated procedures or leads to continuous scrolling.

Show different versions in context. When you embed differences in context (for example, within a particular step), use the following guidelines:

  • Use bullets to denote version differences within a step.
  • If possible, introduce the bulleted differences with a main statement telling the customer to choose from the bullets that follow.
  • Use expandable content (expandos, links that open and close, and so on) instead of bullets if appropriate for the viewer and customer experience.

When denoting individual versions, list the most recent version first and the remaining versions in descending order.

When you denote ranges of versions, avoid using hyphens or en dashes. List the most recent version first, followed by the next most recent versions in descending order.

Examples:
Install QuickBooks.
Create a new company file:
QuickBooks 2014: Choose File > New > Company File.
QuickBooks 2013 and 2012: Choose File > New > New Company File.
QuickBooks 2011, 2010, and earlier: Click the New Company icon.

For numbered versions, use higher/lower. For annual versions use later/earlier.

profit and loss report

Don’t capitalize this term. It’s a summary of the financial performance (revenue and expenses) of a business over time. When writing an accounting term like this, try to define it first and provide the technical word second.

profit and loss statement

Don’t capitalize this term. It’s a summary of the financial performance (revenue and expenses) of a business over time.

When writing an accounting term, define the term first and provide the technical word second.

profit-sharing Keogh plan

Hyphenate “profit-sharing” in this phrase.

program

Don’t use. Instead, use “application” (desktop) or “app” (web or mobile).

property, plant, and equipment (PP&E)

Abbreviate as “PP&E.” But remember, when writing an accounting term like this, define the term first and provide the technical word second.

For the extra curious: The PP&E are the non-current productive fixed assets of a company that are vital to business operations but cannot be easily liquidated. The value of property, plant, and equipment is typically depreciated over the estimated life of the asset, because even the longest-term assets become obsolete or useless after a period of time.

pull

It’s OK to say “Pull down to refresh” if you’re working on mobile. But realistically, we’re all writing for mobile; stay away from device-specific terms. “Refresh” is a great option. You can say, “Refresh to see new transactions.” The user then can shake, tap, click, slide, or whatever new interaction comes our way.

purchase order (PO)

Write it out if it’s the first time the user is encountering it. After that, you can use PO.